1. World Malaria Day 2019: Despite unprecendented success, half the world's population still at risk  Firstpost
  2. World Malaria Day  eNCA
  3. World Malaria Day: Here are some simple hacks to prevent malaria  The Siasat Daily
  4. World Malaria Day 2019: You could avoid severe Plasmodium falciparum malaria if your blood group is O  Times Now
  5. Why Is Malaria on the Rise Again? | by Fredros Okumu  Project Syndicate
  6. View full coverage on Google News
As of 2017, India accounted for only 4 percent of all the malaria cases reported worldwide.As of 2017, India accounted for only 4 percent of all the malaria cases reported worldwide.

World Malaria Day 2019: Despite unprecendented success, half the world's population still at risk- Technology News, Firstpost

New Delhi: When we are surrounded by blood-sucking mosquitoes who are capable of infecting us with Malaria, it only makes sense to take precautions. AsNew Delhi: When we are surrounded by blood-sucking mosquitoes who are capable of infecting us with Malaria, it only makes sense to take precautions. As

World Malaria Day: Here are some simple hacks to prevent malaria

World Malaria Day, celebrated on April 25 every year, seeks to raise awareness about malaria. Did you know that having this particular blood type can help you protect from severe Plasmodium falciparum malaria?World Malaria Day, celebrated on April 25 every year, seeks to raise awareness about malaria. Did you know that having this particular blood type can help you protect from severe Plasmodium falciparum malaria?

In recent decades, strategies for combating malaria have emphasized distributing easy-to-use commodities – including insecticides, insecticide-treated mosquito nets, and artemisinin-based antimalarial drugs – and expanding access to prompt diagnosis. This approach is reaching its limits.In recent decades, strategies for combating malaria have emphasized distributing easy-to-use commodities – including insecticides, insecticide-treated mosquito nets, and artemisinin-based antimalarial drugs – and expanding access to prompt diagnosis. This approach is reaching its limits.

Why Is Malaria on the Rise Again? by Fredros Okumu - Project Syndicate

World Malaria Day: Eat these parasite killing foods to beat malaria | TheHealthSite.com

Polluting activities are resulting in malaria-transmitting mosquitoes expanding into new regions, while adaptation to water pollution has increased their tolerance to pesticides.Polluting activities are resulting in malaria-transmitting mosquitoes expanding into new regions, while adaptation to water pollution has increased their tolerance to pesticides.

How Higher Temperatures and Pollution Are Affecting Mosquitoes

Polluting activities are resulting in malaria-transmitting mosquitoes expanding into new regions, while adaptation to water pollution has increased their tolerance to pesticides.

How Higher Temperatures and Pollution Are Affecting Mosquitoes

World Malaria Day: Malaria can be prevented by avoiding travelling to place where incidence of the disease is high - like tropical and sub tropical areas. Those who are at high risk of malaria include older adults, young children and infants, pregnant women and their unborn children, travellers coming from areas where there is no malaria.World Malaria Day: Malaria is most commonly spread by a mosquito bite. Read here to know how to spot the first symptom of malaria and what you can do to prevent this disease.

World Malaria Day: How To Spot The First Symptom Of Malaria?

Every death from malaria is a tragedy, but many infections can be prevented. This is particularly true for holidaymakers, travellers, or people visiting their families in malaria endemic areas. All they need to do is follow some very simple rules.Every death from malaria is a tragedy, but many infections can be prevented. This is particularly true for holidaymakers, travellers, or people visiting their families in malaria endemic areas. All they need to do is follow some very simple rules.

Heading to a region with malaria? Some simple steps to keep you safe